Demonstrative Communication

Demonstrative Communication
BCOM 275
September 27, 2011
University of Phoenix

Demonstrative Communication

We all have different ways of expressing how or what we are thinking and feeling while communicating with others. We communicate verbally and non-verbally, written or visual. Demonstrative communication is defined as the process of sending and receiving messages and involves exchanging thoughts, messages or information. Demonstrative communication entails sending and receiving wordless messages. It is often used to reinforce verbal communication, though it can stand alone and convey messages on its own. One of the most common ways to communicate non-verbally is with our body language and facial expressions. For example, when someone is tired,   he or she will normally yawn and stretch their arms. This type of body language could be perceived as tiredness by others.   Body language and facial expressions also allow us to receive negative or positive feedback from others.
. Demonstrative communication reinforces verbal communication. For example, dressing properly, a firm handshake and a friendly demeanor can speak volumes about the kind of person someone is at a job interview. A person can rely on these qualities to reinforce his or her verbal performance. When a person meets someone, they can tell if the other   person is friendly, not only because they say hello, but because they smile, speak cheerfully, and face him or her. A person can gain an idea of what others think about them by the non-verbal signals her or she produce. They can also gauge someone‚Äôs reaction to gain positive or negative feedback and use it to his or her advantage.

I work for Red Rock Resort in the security department and interact with people on a daily basis. Through demonstrative communication, I am able to assess if co-workers are engaged in my conversation or if he or she is interested in what I am verbally communicating. This is very important especially since many of my...

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