Critical Thinking

Natural Foods and Cultural Blindness
in Our Healthcare Today
Tonya Bonnett (Garrett)
University of Maryland University College; Intercultural Communication and Leadership


Natural Foods and Cultural Blindness
in Our Healthcare Today
The paper researches the Paleo Community‚Äôs style of eating and how the medical community vastly differs on the approach.   The approach is one that is individually geared to each person and allows each individual to look at what works best for their body.   It also suggests that you work with your culture, environment, gender and food sources to learn to use the foods that work best for healing and nurturing your body. Physicians can have cultural blindness when it comes to nutrition, they tend to look at only what the USDA recommends rather than looking at what really works best for each individual patient.
Nutrition Labels and ingredient lists in the United States are highly regulated and list what the ingredients in the package are as well as what the percentage of daily nutrients you can get from the product. The nutrition standards are where we can have problems since this is for an average person in the United States.   Cultural blindness in this area is an understatement, there are so many variation of individuals in this country that it would be hard to really define what average is.   Physicians often look at what is average to determine what you need and what your bloodwork should be. Fats are a very lively discussion, some doctors advise you to eat low or reduced fat foods but never take into consideration what other chemicals or processing agents are put into that low or reduced fat food to make it palatable. Other doctors recommend eating unprocessed foods including natural occurring fats such as those in meats, avocados and nuts. Eating these natural foods and cutting out the processing and additives usually helps to regulate most blood levels.   However, the Paleo community advises that each individual listen to...