The French and Indian War

The French and Indian war, also known as the Seven Year war, dramatically affected the relations between the colonists and Britain in political, economic and ideological ways. The charge of the war was a direct cause to the alteration in the relations between the two bodies economically, and had the largest effect on the colonists being that Britain placed revenues on the colonies to raise money to compensate their war expenses. Moreover, the two bodies were most affected through their political and ideological relations during the coming years that led to the Revolutionary War. Britain, in repressing the colonies and imposing restrictions on them, caused the ideological reactions of independence and liberty to trek through the colonies and effect more colonists, and as a result, a greater force of patriots in the fight for independence.
      The colonists, being politically apart form England prior to 1740, had rejected the taxes levied on them after the seven years war. The British order stated that even though the revenues coming from the new taxes are very small and inconsiderable, the colonists refuse to pay. The British argue that the war that drove out the French form America needs to be paid for partially by the colonists and that England needs to station troops in the colonies for protection of the proclamation of 1776. The patriot colonists, however, feel that the British parliament is passing new acts to punish the colonies and that the soldiers are stationed in the colonies to prevent uprisings and block smugglers from bringing in tea without paying the taxes. The reason that England wants to prevent an uprising is that England has a triangular trade with the colonies. The colonies get raw material, like wool, or tobacco, and send it to England. England then sells it back to the colonists with a tax, thus taking advantage of the colonists. The British believed in mercantilism, which meant that a county‚Äôs wealth determined the power of that country,...