Organizational Visibility

While the success or failure of any organization depends on a variety of factors, one of the most important factors is that each   member, employee, or client be seen as a person of worth.   Organizations that fail to consider the human need for personal interaction and encouragement often become morally bankrupt long before economic failure occurs.   Corporations have sought ways of keeping employees satisfied   through fair salaries, opportunities for promotion, liberal leave times, insurance provisions, and other perks.   Job security is mostly a lost expectation, but job seekers expect more than   fair salaries.   Failure of companies to meet minimal expectations has resulted in frequent employee turnover and occasionally in resentful backlash including violence.   Obviously an employee's job is vital to a business firm, or it would be eliminated.   In order to save the expense of frequent retraining, companies experiment with creative ways to encourage and retain employees.   The simple solution of encouraging opportunities to interact positively with colleagues has proven successful for numerous organizations and corporations.

  Many ills of society have been associated with feelings of alienation.   Human beings move about the globe in patterns not unlike ants moving from place to place on sorties to obtain sustenance.   City dwellers in Paris note that their days consist of m├ętro, boulot, dodo, (transport, job, and sleep), identical to that of urban life elsewhere. Those who live in suburbs drive to work, spending boring hours tied up In traffic. Exhausted from such routines, people find small cheer in social life which is more often currently associated with social networking sites accessed from handheld devices.   Habit-forming, such devices result in few face-to-face interactions (not counting image-to-image).   Device-led life translates into every kind of public venue.   Diners are seen carrying on cell phone conversations while ignoring their dining partners....