North Korea

North Korea (i /ˈnɔrθ kəˌriə/), officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK; Chosongul: 조선민주주의인민공화국, Hancha: 朝鮮民主主義人民共和國), is a country in East Asia, occupying the northern half of the Korean Peninsula. Its capital and largest city is Pyongyang. The Korean Demilitarized Zone serves as the buffer zone between North Korea and South Korea. The Amnok River and the Tumen River form the border between North Korea and the People's Republic of China. A section of the Tumen River in the far northeast is the border with Russia.

The peninsula was governed by the Korean Empire until it was annexed by Japan following the Russo-Japanese War of 1905. It was divided into Soviet and American occupied zones in 1945, following the end of World War II. North Korea refused to participate in a United Nations–supervised election held in the south in 1948, which led to the creation of separate Korean governments for the two occupation zones. Both North and South Korea claimed sovereignty over the Korean Peninsula as a whole, which led to the Korean War of 1950. The Armistice Agreement of 1953 ended the fighting; however, the two countries are officially still at war with each other, as a peace treaty was never signed.[10] Both states were accepted into the United Nations in 1991.[11]

North Korea is a single-party state under a united front led by the Korean Workers' Party (KWP).[12][13][14][15] The country's government follows the Juche ideology of self-reliance, developed by the country's former President, Kim Il-sung. After his death, Kim Il-sung was declared to be the country's Eternal President. Juche became the official state ideology when the country adopted a new constitution in 1972,[16] though Kim Il-sung had been using it to form policy since at least as early as 1955.[17] After the collapse of the Soviet Union and a series of natural disasters, a famine occurred, causing the death of 900,000 to 2 million people.[18] Facing these circumstances, leader Kim...
  • North Korea And The New Administration
    any missile threats from countries like North Korea. Perhaps the irony behind this logic approach is that North Korea would realize that reciprocity has ended...
  • North Korea
    power technology, and training to North Korea. China began supplying North Korea with missile technology in the 1970s. The North Korean nuclear weapons program was...
  • North Korea
    North Korea. Some of the problems that were brought up in this article were North Korea's plan to restart a plutonium based nuclear program at Yongbyon, North Korea...
  • North Korea Surprise Attack
    Korea. Syngman Rhee had so often talked about invading North Korea that US leaders feared giving him too much in the way of weapons. For this reason, South Korea...
  • North Korea
    and preventing North Korea from retaliating with missile strikes. Use of U.S. bases in South Korea would make an attack easier. Although North Korea has capable...