Nursing Assesment and Theory to Care for a Patient with Copd

  • Submitted by: melissajane93
  • Views: 505
  • Category: Science
  • Date Submitted: 06/09/2013 08:11 AM
  • Pages: 7

Nursing Assesment and Theory to Care for a Patient with Copd

The aim of this essay is to review one patients’ health condition and to assess his needs and how the nurse can help to meet his needs during his stay in hospital. By doing this the nurse will use a number of different nursing assessments and theories. To maintain confidentiality for the patient he will be referred as Tim Jones throughout this essay (Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC), 2008).   Mr Jones is a 69 year old male and was admitted to hospital with exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to a chest infection. This patient has no allergies and a past medical history of COPD and bullous emphysema. Mr Jones lives at home in a ground floor bungalow with no social work services. He is now a non-smoker - been stopped for 15 years. Mr Jones requires oxygen therapy and regular nebulisers and inhalers. He is independent and continent, his mobility is good although nursing staff have noticed a decrease since admission.   Mr Jones is a retired farmer, he did not wish to retire but due to his COPD he felt he could no longer manage. The nursing theory being used to assess Mr Jones will be the Roper, Logan and Tierney Model for Nursing. The assessments being used will be the regular admission assessments (Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), The Waterlow Assessment Tool and the COPD Assessment tool (CAT)).
On admission Mr Jones’ vital signs were recorded. He weighed in at 62.3kg and a height of 6’0”. His BMI (body mass index) was scoring at a 19.   His respirations were 23 breaths per minute, his oxygen saturations were at 82% on 2 litres of oxygen, blood pressure was 129/67, heart rate was between 80-90 beats per minute and his temperature was 36.2 degrees Celsius. This was all recorded on his SEWS chart (Scottish Early Warning System). Using the MUST screening tool (figure 1) we assessed Mr Jones’ malnutrition risk and he scored a 2. This score was calculated using his BMI, weight loss score and acute disease score. This score means...
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