Martin Luther's Impact on Christianity

Martin Luther's Impact on Christianity

Martin Luther was a 16th century monk, priest, teacher and reformer. He was born in 1483 in a town called Eisleben. Luther was a fundamental figure in the history of Christianity. Luther grew up in a time of renewal and new ideas throughout Europe. This gave rise to Luther’s ability to challenge the church which led to the initiation of the protestant reformation which completely changed the structure of the church, dividing the two churches (east and west) into the beginning of the protestant reformation. He made this significant impact in many areas including; Institutional impact, theological, individual, laity and liturgical impact. It is through these areas that Luther had made his greatest impact on Christianity. These impacts have been recognised by many theologians including Wayne Blank who said Luther was “...one of only a very few whose life would mark a turning point in the religious and political history of...the entire world”.


Martin Luther believed that the way in which the institution of the church was being run, from the Pope as the highest power through to the priests and monks. He believed that the church was; corrupt in its use of power, it’s structure and the way it was governed. Luther accused the Roman Church of heresy that is; going against the traditional and orthodox views. This included their selling of indulgences to the people in the hope of salvation. Article 32 of the 95 Theses, written by Luther, clearly rejected this sale, ‘Those who suppose that on account of their letters of indulgence they are sure of salvation will be eternally damned along with their teachers’. Martin Luther was also amongst one of the first to question the authority of the Pope. He was quoted as saying “the pope may speak the truth, but it isn’t the truth because the pope speaks it.” He put it to the people that the Pope’s authority was not absolute and unquestionable, and that it was still susceptible to being mislead and abused. This caused the people...
Join Now!